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loves: taxes. who in america doesn't grow up excitedly leaving a box of your old receipts at the foot of your bed on april 15 eve hoping that if you've been good an accountant from the north pole will show up on his magic sleigh and reward you with a surprisingly large invoice from the government? but did you know that our tax system is somehow not universally beloved? >> we need to overhaul our tax code. >> the tax code is broken. it's not fair. >> it is inefficient. our tax code is one of the worst in the world. >> simplify the tax code. we need to change our tax code. >> john: whoa, watch your mouth. you can't just talk to codes like that. they're very sensitive. this is exactly the kind of criticism that drove the morse code to suicide. for all of you morse code fans. yes, look, we all think the tax code needs pruning every now and again. that is why we do it, i imagine, every three to five years. >> our tax code hasn't been reformed since 1986. that's 27 years. >> wow. to put that in perspective, the tax reform act of 1986 happened the same year that this was happening. >> i'm co
is better for our friends and neighbors and ourselves than what they believe. >> and the america i live in disagreement is a way of life, that's how you get better solutions. you know, i don't want to be in an america where you cannot have dissent or disagreement. >> reporter: priebus warned the gop about being too combative at the expense of the conservative movement. >> if you just want to be angry, if you don't want to be a problem solver, you're putting yourself ahead of the movement, you're putting your personal ambition in front of your patriotic duty. >> reporter: what republicans seem most excited about, the digital campaign. there's a lot of work to do to catch up with democrats. but they'll roll out more this fall. >> thanks. >>> stocks finished on a down note. dow lost 31, s&p 500 fell 5, nasdaq dropped three for the week, dow lost 2.25%, worst week this year. s&p 500 dropped a little over 2%, nasdaq about a point and a half. >>> speaking of big money, the obama administration has bet and lost heavily on green energy. think solyndra. that has not stopped the white house from
the baseball game last night. we'll talk about what this means for america's pastime. plus, you may love that morning cup of coffee and then some. but how much is too much? that's just ahead. can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&♪ hooking up the countryess. whelping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big count
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
plus seats in the air -- feet in the air. bonsai pipeline at six flags america. pass the high test. i did take one ride down. in order to get a video, cool vantage point for you viewers at home once i get to the bottom of this. so we start by opening the capsule and there's six capsules up here, all on this platform. and so they're able to handle quite a load of people. so i'm ready to step on up and if you don't mind taking the microphone from me when it's time to jump in. all right, let's do it, here we go, here's the noise. there we go. here. thank you. all right, get on in your capsule. trap door at my feet. i'm standing almost vertically right now. got to cross your arms. cross your feet. head back. back, a little bit back. i hate this part. i hate this part! whoo! whoo! [laughter] >> thank you, amy, for holding the microphone. that noise, the little clunk, clunk, and you wait, whoosh you get thrown down. honestly you don't realize what happened till your halfway down the slide, then it gets dark and that's when it whips you around the tube. different vantage point, i was wearing
is america's money. >> good morning, topping america's money, the price at the much just keeping on dropping. gas prices have slipped 7-cents in one week, now down to $3.56 a gallon. isle refineries have been keeping output high. will apple take a bite out of blackberry? potential buyers may be rival apple or google if only to get their hands on that technology. and facebook c.o.o. is getting her hands on a huge chunk of cash. she sold a 5% block of her facebook staff. said to be worth $400 million. and move other james patterson, james has knocked them off the highest paid list. even bypassing other literary giants like danielle steel and steven king that's america's money. >> "i'm terry mcauliffe, candidate for governor, and i sponsored this ad." it's been called "cuccinelli's witch hunt" "designed to intimidate and suppress" ken cuccinelli used taxpayer funds to investigate a uva professor whose research on climate chge cuccinelli opposed. cuccinelli, a climate change denier, forced the university to spend over half a million dollars defending itself against it's own attorney general. ken
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
a political perspective, america does not want to touch the kind of mess in the middle east. theink that is just political context and reality of this. you asked whether any of us have regrets. regarding our support for democracy in the muslim brotherhood. let me be very clear. i know you know this. the three people sitting up here today have each been very clear eyed and very critical of what we saw as actions by the muslim brotherhood and president morsi that were undermining democratic prospects in egypt. president morsi issued a decree that set him above judicial review. he ran through a constitution that was asked visionary -- was exclusionary. were pushing ay law that would have eviscerated the judiciary. it would have clamped down public protests. civilld have nationalized society organizations in the country. i don't think any of us had any illusions about the trajectory that he was on and we all voice to those concerns. think, to no way i say that i am easily relaxed about the outcome in egypt. i think what happened on july 3 has sent a country further down the path toward
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
veterans of america, represents nearly 200,000 people, many of whom are young vets. msnbc contributor bill briggs joins me now with his report on this. bill, we've talked so much about the suicide rate and the problems, though, that these vets cite, sadly, are things that you would think could be addressed by our government, including getting their benefits when they retire and some other things that can be taken care of for them. >> yeah, the backlog on benefit -- receiving their benefits is enormous. that's contributing to this problem and has been for several years. it's such a complex issue, and it involves so many realities of coming home from war, reintegrating with your family, reintegrating with your community, finding a job, substance abuse. it's a very complex issue that i think some experts are finally starting to get a handle on maybe what's triggering this spike. >> and what do they believe is the key component? and i feel terrible trying to minimize this to one thing because as you pointed out, it's a laundry list of things these men and women face. >> yeah, what's really int
republicans don't do enough is give an alternative. we need to start telling the people of america what our health care alternative is and we've yet to do that. >> bob, there's no accountability as we've been saying about other issues because of hyper partisan districts. if i'm a gop member of the house and rail against obama care and say let's defund the government, et cetera, et cetera, and maybe public surveys across the country say that individual is out of step, chances are they're not out of step in their own district. >> i think that's true. one of the problems the republican party has now is that it rode the tea party to power in the house in 2010 and now stuck with all those people. i think john is largely right about what sensible republicans want to do. i'm not sure he's right about the ways out. but you have a whole group of folks who might just take this over the cliff. if boehner holds to the rule that he has to have a majority of the majority before he'll bring anything to the floor, you might just have a government shutdown. and sensible people in the republican party like j
of the egyptians. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for the egyptian people. we don't take sides with any particular party or political figure. i know it is tempting inside of egypt to blame the united states or the west or some other outside actor for what's gone wrong. that kind of approach will do nothing to help egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> joining me today, political editor and white house correspondent at "the huffington post," sam stein. "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, founder and editor at large, charlie senate, jon meacham author of "thomas jefferson -- the art of power." joining us now from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman muhyeldin. we're hearing from the spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood that they want to remain nonviolent and peaceful. we are also at the same time hearing news that there is live ammo being launched by morsi supporters and molotov cocktails. can you give us the latest on the situation on th
call minds in america is set to join us tonight. we're going to ask larry sabato about what's wrong with the deck kratz today. hillary clinton's presidential chnss and get a look at the big new online course and all about the legacy of john f. kennedy. all of those stories and more coming up on "the kudlow report" coming up right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." the federal reserve minutes. did they tell us anything? steve liesman joins us in jackson hole. >> good evening, larry, from jackson hole where the fed is gathering. they're gathering without ben bernanke and mario draghi. the fed is releasing its minutes from the july meeting in which it showed no clear intention as to the tapering in september. the committee is split with a few members saying the fed should be patient before tapering. there was not enough economic data and a few members saying the fed should stick to the plan announced in june. quote, it might soon be time to taper. almost all of the participants were pretty comfortable with the june guidance which said that t
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
: in fact america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the word. >> we are a 24 hour a day country. we are always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on face book where people post "can't fall asleep. taking my ambien. lights out y'all. and ambien, i got to agree that i have a love/hate thing with you. i'm talking to a doctor about getting off of you. >> you have people that come to you and say i want to get off of this. >> all the time. the majority of the patients i see. >> reporter: not being able to sleep can be a curse, affecting a person's ability to function. research shows sleep aid do work, allowing us to catch much needed zs. is a drug-induced sleep just as good as falling asleep the old-fashioned way. >> a lot of people feel it is real sleep. a lot of people don't feel the sleep quality is good. >> reporter: the doctor points out only a limited number of studies looked at long term effects of chronic use. that is something people don't lose sleep over as they. pop ano
was a really good friend. next. all throughout high school we hung out. >> heroin's increasing toll on america. and later...? >> in three more years, star trek is going to be celebrating its golden anniversary.,, [ female announcer ] new nature valley soft-baked oatmeal squares. hearty oatmeal now softly baked with a drizzle of cinnamon. it's a brand-new take on a morning classic. soft-baked oatmeal squares. new from nature valley. ♪ you have to let me know [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >> osgood: no parents want to believe their child could be hooked on heroin. so it's always a shocking discovery when they find out. it does happen every day and sometimes in places where you would least expect it. our colleagues at "48 hours" have spent the last few months investigating heroin addiction in a small town in illinois. our cover story is reported now by maureen maher. >> it's thursday afternoon in the levy chicago suburb of naperville, illinois. >> i will be home later.
, it is a scandal. but if it came up in the of the context that you raised first, it's just part of life in america. >> ladies and gentlemen, on that note, floyd has kindly agreed to sign his book. again, critics have given it an incredible review, and it's just a breathtaking book. i've read and it's breathtaking. i would strongly urge you to have your book signed by floyd but if you could just remain seated for about 20 seconds. my last question to float, could you tell us if the society for challenge into getting and the supreme court questioning? [laughter] >> certainly much more relaxing. >> actually. on outlook know, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in thanking one of the most brilliant scholars and lawyers that this nation has had that has impacted many of our lives on a regular basis. thank you. [applause] >> you are watching tv on c-span2. 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> up next, booktv's peter slen into his office and one. this weaknesses concludes with military historian antony beevor followed by victorian era expert judith flanders. antony beevor talked ab
. america live starts right now. >> starting with the fox news alert. a big opening blast on what is described as the potential coming war over who gets to vote. welcome everybody to america live and so there are debates breaking out over how our elections should be held and what rules will be in place when it comes to voting. the issue erupted after the supreme court went down and that gave a bit more power to set their own rules on these things and that ruling sparked protest and drew sharp criticism from the justice department and former secretary of state addressed the issue at an event that many will be a 2016 presidential run for her. >> we have seen a sweeping effort in our country to obstruct new obstacles to voting. under cover and addressing election fraud. in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights are introduced in 31 states. not every obstacle is to race. but those who say racial is not a problem in the election must not be paying attention. >> that is from hillary clinton. >> our host of power play. chris. chris, is this the makings of a battle tha
're on day 25 of filner watch. >>> and honoring america's heroes. first responders front and center. >> there is no second chance in if you're late, it will matter. >> country music superstar tim mcgraw and a new program to empower our firefighters and emts. >> share these stories with you. >> mcgraw joins me live, straight ahead. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. no flight data recorders, no communications and no answers. the big question remains this morning, why did a u.p.s. cargo jet crash just before landing in alabama? right now more than 24 hours after the crash, the cockpit and voice recorders have yet to be recovered. both remain inside the still smoldering wreckage. now, the answers may be in those recorde recorders, since there was no communication from the pilots to air traffic control just before the crash and the only clues available are from witnesses. >> when i got up, it just, i just heard like a boom, boom. and i didn't know what it was. i was just staring out the window and i looked
that is estimated to create 50 permanent jobs. that is not a jobs p.m. eastern on america's news headquarters. have a great day, everybody. >>> allowing the keystone pipeline to built requires a finding that doing so would be in our nation's interest. our national interest will be served only if the project does not significantly exacerbate carbon solution. >> david: did we find out that the keystone pipeline is not a solution problem. there is a new record revealing that the proposal to expand it will not impact greenhouse gas emissions. steve york you say it makes it impossible for the president to justify delaying the project any longer. this president will try to come one a way to delay th thing. i would rather have oil going through pipelines than on trains and if investors are willing to finance it, go for it. good for us. less oil from venezuela. good all around. >> david: rick, the bottom line of the report, says if we don't do the pipeline we have to substitute the oil from venezuela, which is dirty oil. >> be careful here. that is absolutely true. what the report was talking about is carb
for a dinner when they go on a date. this is why birth rate is too low in america. let me say, you can solve this problem, pay for dinner,and be a cheap skate because you can get two for one -- >> no wonder you're not married. >> any dead beat man who doesn't open a door for a woman and make her pay -- so much alimony to my husband, i'm never having dinner again. "cavuto on business" up next. >> did harry reid let his party's real health care plan out of the bag? good morning. it looks like democrats go along with with the bad private health care in america. that's not me saying it, although i have often said it. more on me later, my favorite subject. now back to the senate majority leader and what he was saying when asked about whether he was actually working to scrap our present health care basis. >> we are far from having something that will work. >> eventually, you think we'll work beyond -- >> yes. >>
that was badly needed in america not only for those in attendance but those who could hear and see on television and to send a message to washington, to the state houses, to the local levels that the movement is still alive. and we have to believe that, and we have to act on it. i'm one of the old citizens of the time. i could not help but reflect on things such as the fact that we were not allowed -- people of color were not allowed on television shows. we did hold places in government. i used the theme that had such a negative connotation, stand your ground. i hope i got over to the crowd we need to seize that and use it as our own in a positive way. stand our ground for what we believe, for what we have worked and for what we have died for and move forward. >> it's a reclamation of that spiritual "we shall not be moved" that version of stand your ground. i love what you said about the young people. there was a group from howard university right there near where our msnbc stand was all day. i could sort of watch and see how they were responding. but it was also important what you just said abo
crisis, what is the state of the banking system now? what can be done to pull america out of this tepid period of growth? we are joined by incredible experts on the panel. mohammed el-erian, ceo of pacific investment management company. sheila bair, senior adviser to charitable trusts. john taylor, professor of economics at stanford university and senior fellow at the hoover institution. he is well-known for the taylor rule, a monetary policy principle that offers guidance on how to tinker with interest rates to control inflation. taylor served as undersecretary of the treasury during the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i want to kick off the panel with you. you coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? >> let me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that it would not
in america? ask me about my tempur-pedic. ask me how fast i fall asleep. ask me about staying asleep. [announcer] tempur-pedic owners are more satisfied than owners of any traditional mattress brand. tempur-pedic. the most highly recommended bed in america. buy a tempur-pedic mattress set and get a free twin tempur-simplicity mattress. find a store near you at tempurpedic.com. it's been that way ysince e day you meam. but your erectile dysfunction - itld be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you cabe more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and meditions, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause unsafe drop in blood pressure. do notrink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or musc
oliver. i am still in for jon stewart who is scourge competing to be america's next top model. oh, no, they voted him out! they voted him-- don't listen to them, jon. you're beautiful on the inside! and there is no shame being more catalog than editorial. that's a fact. my guest tonight the writer, director, and staffer a very funny new movie "in a world" lake bell will be here. very good, very good. but we begin tonight with breaking news. >> the big chill between the u.s. and russia may be heading for the deep freeze. president obama has officially canceled his one-on-one meeting with vladimir putin. >> john: canceled? wow, that's a big diplomatic slap in the face, a dip move, if you will. ( laughter ) although if the president really wanted to hurt putin he would have said he was coming and just stood him up. trust me, that hurts a lot more. or if you wanted to be more passive aggressive the president could have said let's meet somewhere that's not technically in russia like, i don't know, moscow airport. ( cheers and applause ) look, we all know-- we all know why this meeting was
is going to be able to sell cricket to america. >> you never heard of gorgey thompson. >> john: i do. she knows you and i've been asking her about you. >> john: whoa! after the show we'll talk. john: she's fantastic. she was on the news for years. >> ten years. john: good luck selling cricket. >> do you play cricket. john: you know what? everything in britain is class based. so cricket is for posh people. >> really? john: that's not for the likes of me. i know i sound like it. >> what sport did you play as a kid growing up. >> john: soccer. religiously. >> it's a big deal. it's getting bigger and bigger in america. >> john: i want to be a soccer player more than anything else. this was very much plan-b. >> how in the world did this happen? you wanted to play soccer and here you are. >> john: it was a complete lack of physical ability. and that's all. >> you couldn't kick the ball. john: are you a frustrated athlete as well? >> i used to play in bronx park. john: play what? baseball. john: classic. a little football. yeah, sure. >> john: you're a yankee fan. yes, i am. (a few people in the
listen america, nixon now ♪ nixon now, nixon now he's shown us how ♪ ♪ nixon now, nixon now, listen america, nixon now ♪ >> president nixon's victory in the election is surely one of the biggest land slides ever. let's look at the popular vote with almost all of it counted. 98% of the precincts reporting, nixon 45 million, mcgovern, 28 million. this adds up to a record breaking 520 electoral votes for president nixon, who won 49 states. mcgovern carried only massachusetts and the district of columbia for 17 electoral votes. >> at first, it was called the watergate caper. five men apparently caught in the act of burglarizing and bugging democratic headquarters in washington. but the episode grew steadily more sinister. no longer a caper, but the watergate affair escalating finally into charges of a high level campaign of political sabotage and espionage, apparently unparalleled in american history. the charges center around a man whose name means secrets. >> donald segretti. white house aides recruited him for secret intelligence fork and dirty tricks against the democrats. he went
to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [ command center ] this is command center. [ man ] ...3, 2, 1. [ command center ] all systems go. [ female announcer ] introducing swiffer steamboost powered by bissell. steam-activated cleaning pads penetrate deep. [ command center ] we have lift off. [ female announcer ] don't just clean your floor. boost it. >>> live from america's news headquarters, i'm kelly wright. a massive wildfire triggering a state of emergency in san francisco. the flames are about 150 miles away in yosemite national park. but the city's utilities are in danger, as miles of power lines lay in the path of the fire. officials say san francisco has been forced to shut down two of the power stations so far. further disruption could have effect on the power su
offered a chilling prediction for america that she calls inevitable. we will cover her less than an uplifting words. next. with centurylink as your trusted partner, our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and responsive, dedicated support, we constantly evolve to meet your needs. every day of the week. centurylink® your link to what's next. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is one take away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraced as secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also the first woman to hold the
napolitano offered a chilling prediction for america th she calls inevitable. inevitable. we will cover her@áh%h%k%k%k5 aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your goodriving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is oneake away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraceds secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also th
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
on here at home this is a time to get off all foreign oil, especially foreign oil outside of north america. no reason to get off mexican and canadian oil. they're our friends. >> i feel like we've been saying this how many years now. >> beginning of time. >> fought with iraq, get off oil. gas hits $3, get off oil. we're not. nothing is happening. the problem, of course, is no one is making any more money than they were when gas was back at $3. so this is absolutely going to crunch the economy. especially your lower and middle-class people that don't have that much discretionary income to begin wit and now taking more of it. i fill my car up twice a week commuting and taking my kids point a to point b. this will hurt me. >> $4 oil is a killer. that's 40 to $50 dlb out of the economy. cost of goods sold goes up, cost of everything goes up and nothing good happens at that point in time. >> gary, i mean -- >> except for the fact that -- >> go ahead. >> increases new opportunities for people making alternative forms of fuel that are cost prohibitive for investment right now but when you have oi
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